CVN writes City Council on proposed new Housing Vancouver Strategy (2018-2027)

November 26, 2017

City of Vancouver Council
Dear Mayor Gregor Robertson and Councillors,

Vancouver Housing Strategy

November 26, 2017
City of Vancouver Council
Dear Mayor Gregor Robertson and Councillors,

Re: Vancouver Housing Strategy

As strong supporters of the need for affordable housing, especially for residents who live and work here, we appreciate the City’s efforts with the new Vancouver Housing Strategy. While the City finally acknowledges that speculative capital and land inflation created by increased density are driving unaffordability, the proposed solutions are again based on increasing supply through rezoning. This focus on additional supply through up zoning has proven to be one of the primary contributors to increased land inflation and undermines our shared objective of improving housing affordability. On that basis, we are opposed to this proposed plan.

We are particularly concerned about the proposals for city-wide rezoning to greatly increase new strata townhouses, rowhouses and apartments in ways that run counter to the CityPlan Community Visions and Local Area Planning processes that were promised to guide future increases of growth at the neighbourhood level. With the new proposed strategy, character house retention incentives would also be undermined, resulting in more demolitions and expensive new development that locals cannot afford.

Neighbourhood character and fit should be considered on a neighbourhood-by-neighbourhood basis, with meaningful community participation, not by a citywide blanket override of existing zoning bylaws, community plans and neighbourhood-specific concerns. We agree that there should be opportunities for more housing choice all across the city, but any changes to zoning should be implemented appropriately for each neighbourhood. Density bonuses, intended to increase affordability in Rental 100 projects, could have the opposite effect by creating much larger developments that inflate land values for properties around the site with buildings that are out of scale with the neighbourhood. Targeting major developments for transit hubs has already proven to inflate both housing and land costs, yet this plan proposes to maintain this negative path.

Retaining current rental stock receives relatively little attention, despite being the most affordable option for residents. Retaining character houses by encouraging secondary suites that can provide additional rental housing and mortgage helper income will have less impact on land inflation than demolition and new larger developments. Making it easier for renovations and more secondary suites is a faster, more effective approach to affordability, yet is less of a priority in this plan than more expensive new development.

The City has provided virtually no time to review and respond to this massive 248 page report, posting it 2 to their website only last Friday; just two business days ahead of Council consideration. This clear lack of respect for the public’s interest flies in the face of the Mayor’s 2014 apology and commitment to listen to voters in the future. Vancouver’s voters expect and deserve better.

We request that this report not be approved at this time. Recommendations are complex, with far reaching implications. This report should be referred for meaningful participation to the communities that will have to live with the results of this process.

Sincerely,

Larry Benge, Co-Chair
Dorothy Barkley, Co-Chair

On behalf of the Coalition of Vancouver Neighbourhoods

Member Groups of the Coalition of Vancouver Neighbourhoods

 

Arbutus Ridge Community Association
Arbutus Ridge/ Kerrisdale/ Shaughnessy Visions
Cedar Cottage Area Neighbours
Chinatown Action Group
Citygate Intertower Group
Community Association of New Yaletown
Crosstown Residents Association
Downtown Eastside Neighbourhood Council
Dunbar Residents Association
False Creek Residents Association
Grandview Woodland Area Council
Granville Burrard Residents & Business Association
Joyce Area Residents
Kitsilano-Arbutus Residents Association
Kits Point Residents Association
Marpole Oakridge Community Association
Norquay Residents
NW Point Grey Home Owners Association
Oakridge Langara Area Residents
Residents Association Mount Pleasant
Riley Park/South Cambie Visions
Shaughnessy Heights Property Owners Association
Strathcona Residents Association
Upper Kitsilano Residents Association
West End Neighbours Society
West Kitsilano Residents Association
West Point Grey Residents Association

Reference: http://council.vancouver.ca/20171128/documents/rr1.pdf

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Responses from City Council by-election candidates to CVN’s 10 questions

(Updated to 11 am, Oct 13) CVN sent ten questions to candidates for the October 14 civic by-election in Vancouver. See the questions at this link.

Below we provide the responses, in the order received. (To read, you may find it easiest to open two windows — one with the questions, and one with the responses.)

Here is a list of the candidates (alphabetical order) and updated status of their responses:

  • BREMNER, Hector (NPA) – Response received 10/11 (below)
  • CARDONA, Diego (Vision Vancouver)
  • DUNSDON, Mary Jean “Watermelon” (Sensible Vancouver)
  • FRY, Pete (Green Party) – Response received 10/11 (below)
  • GRAVES, Judy (OneCity) Response received 10/13 (below)
  • LEE, Gary
  • MURPHY, Damian J – Response received 10/12 (below)
  • SWANSON, Jean – Response received 10/12 (below)
  • WASILENKOFF, Joshua Continue reading
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CVN asks 10 questions to Oct 14 by-election candidates

The Coalition of Vancouver Neighbourhoods has sent the following ten questions to each of the candidates for the single contested seat on Vancouver City Council, and will post any answers received online as they are received.

CVN represents 27 Vancouver community neighourhood associations across the city. The current City Council and its approach to development and the management of City resources has been a great concern. While many Vancouver residents understand that change must come they also feel that this Council does not respect the current look, feel and character of existing neighbourhoods—the very things that have made them so successful and attractive.

This by-election is seen as a critical election and for that reason the CVN is asking candidates the following questions to better understand their positions and report the findings to member associations and the public.

**********

TEN QUESTIONS FROM THE COALITION OF VANCOUVER NEIGHBOURHOODS

1. The B.C. government has tabled a bill that would rein in political fundraising rules at the provincial level, including banning corporate and union donations and limiting individual contributions to $1,200. There is a strong desire to see new standards imposed on municipalities. How would you limit fundraising in Vancouver, would it include any limits on developers, and would you include limits on campaign spending?

2. There is currently a lack of neighbourhood involvement in the planning processes in Vancouver. Please tell us how you would help to facilitate the re-involvement of neighbourhoods in the planning of the City’s future?

3. There is much controversy around the City’s current definitions of ‘affordable housing’ and ‘social housing’.

3a) CMHC defines housing as affordable if shelter costs account for less than 30 per cent of before-tax household income. Do you agree that this definition should be used for publicly subsidized rental projects and will you advocate for its inclusion in all such projects?

3b) The CoV defines a building project as “social housing” if 30% of dwelling units are occupied by households that don’t have the income to pay market rents. The City provides generous subsidies to these projects. Do you agree with this and will you advocate for its inclusion in all such projects?

4. Transit is a major issue in Vancouver. What do you think of the City’s program of building a subway on Broadway instead of a network of surface transit that would serve all areas of the City? What would you recommend and why?

5. As a follow-up, how do you feel about Metro Vancouver’ Mayors defining certain streets as Frequent Transit Corridors (ie. ‘Broadway Corridor’), thus taking development decisions out of the hands of the citizens of the affected areas? and how would you require the CofV Planners treat the major arterial roads in Vancouver?

6. We’ve heard many times, whenever someone asks about how to affect affordability in the City, that it can only be changed through provincial action. What are the ways that the City Council can affect issues of affordability? Give specifics, please.

7. Neighbourhoods in Vancouver are seeing the closure of a number of local businesses, at least in part because of unaffordable property taxes. What policies would you propose to make it affordable for local businesses to continue to operate in Vancouver?

8. Rents are skyrocketing right along with real estate prices. Should Vancouver impose rent control and, if so, what types? Give specifics, please.

9. Most would agree that we need more social housing in Vancouver. Should there be a requirement for equal distribution of social housing across the City and should any residential development over 10 units include 10% social housing? 20%? Why, or why not?

10. “What specific policies or regulations, if any, should the City adopt to ensure that housing is developed and sold for local residents to live in, rather than primarily as an investment opportunity?

 

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Third CVN Letter Again Supports Chinatown Community in Opposition to Rezoning

On May 19, 2017, the Coalition of Vancouver Neighbourhoods sent the following letter to Mayor Gregor Robertson and the Vancouver City Council regarding concerns about the proposed rezoning for 105 Keefer St. and 544 Columbia St., in Chinatown.

This letter follows two prior letters, sent to Council on June 29, 2016, and again on February 26, 2017, regarding two earlier proposals for this same site. This third rezoning application is regrettably little changed from the original.

As explained in this latest letter, CVN recommends that City Council not approve the proposed rezoning application.

CVN encourages those who value the retention of Chinatown’s community and heritage to send a letter to the Mayor and Council using this handy email generator: http://savechinatownyvr.herokuapp.com/campaigns/oppose-105-keefer-rezoning.

CVN represents a united and diverse group of nearly 30 neighbourhood associations all across the City of Vancouver.

This letter is also available for download as a PDF (124kb):
CVN Letter to Council – Chinatown – 105 Keefer – May 19, 2017

May 19, 2017

City of Vancouver Council

Dear Mayor Gregor Robertson and Councillors,

Re: Public Hearing for 105 Keefer St. and 544 Columbia St., Chinatown

The Coalition of Vancouver Neighbourhoods joins the local community to OPPOSE the above rezoning application. During consultation on this current application, 75% of the community has expressed their opposition. Please reject this proposal.

The application has not been significantly changed to address community concerns and is essentially the same proposal that has been repeatedly opposed by the local community since 2014. A few more small tweaks do not make this proposal acceptable.

Please listen to the community requests for a much smaller scale project that minimizes the impacts on the Chinese Cultural Centre and the Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Garden across the street, with a design that fits into the heritage character of the heart of this historic Chinatown neighbourhood.

Sincerely,

Larry Benge, Chair

On behalf of the Coalition of Vancouver Neighbourhoods
Contact: info@coalitionvan.org

Member Groups of the Coalition of Vancouver Neighbourhoods

Arbutus Ridge Community Association
Arbutus Ridge/ Kerrisdale/ Shaughnessy Visions
Cedar Cottage Area Neighbours
Chinatown Action Group
Citygate Intertower Group
Community Association of New Yaletown
Crosstown Residents Association
Downtown Eastside Neighbourhood Council
Dunbar Residents Association
False Creek Residents Association
Grandview Woodland Area Council
Granville Burrard Residents & Business Association
Joyce Area Residents Association
Kitsilano-Arbutus Residents Association
Kits Point Residents Association
Marpole Residents Coalition
Norquay Residents
NW Point Grey Home Owners Association
Oakridge Langara Area Residents
Ray-Cam
Residents Association Mount Pleasant
Riley Park/South Cambie Visions
Shaughnessy Heights Property Owners Association
Strathcona Residents Association
Upper Kitsilano Residents Association
West End Neighbours
West Kitsilano Residents Association
West Point Grey Residents Association

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CVN Sends Letter to Council re 105 Keefer St., Chinatown

On February 26, 2017, the Coalition of Vancouver Neighbourhoods sent the following letter to Mayor Gregor Robertson and the Vancouver City Council. This letter expresses concerns regarding the proposed rezoning for 105 Keefer St. in Chinatown.

As explained in the letter, CVN recommends that City Council not approve the proposed rezoning application.

CVN represents a diverse group of nearly 30 neighbourhood associations all across the City of Vancouver.

This letter is also available for download as a PDF (90kb):
CVN.Ltr to Council.105 Keefer.pdf

February 26, 2017

City of Vancouver Council

Dear Mayor Gregor Robertson and Councillors,

Re: 105 Keefer St. Rezoning Application

The proposed rezoning for 105 Keefer Street, in the heart of Chinatown, presents many concerns for the Coalition of Vancouver Neighbourhoods. We cannot support this proposed rezoning application.

And we are not alone among neighbourhood and community groups who oppose the development. Over 1800 combined signatures opposing the proposals have been gathered to date. Past and current proposals have been rejected by Chinatown Heritage Area Planning Committee, Vancouver Chinatown Revitalization Committee and the Building Community Society of Greater Vancouver.

The first question which needs to be asked is why aren’t we protecting our historic Chinatown district, and that doesn’t mean just one token street. This is one of the largest Chinatowns in North America, a truly unique district with its own distinct flavour and character. It is one of the elements that make Vancouver unique in the world.

And if we are trying to conserve this district with its flavour and character for future generations, while being realistic in a desire to blend it into a future coexistence with a changing city, what is this proposed building doing to help us achieve these goals? We would say, ‘very little, if anything’. It has been criticized for the following:

  • The proposed units will not be affordable to those in the community who are being displaced, who are most in need.
  • It will by its nature, promote additional loss of affordability in the community, displacing vulnerable citizens and the affordable, culturally appropriate businesses they depend on.
  • Lack of any architectural detail, texture or character that would tie it to its location as a part of Chinatown.
  • Shows a total lack of respect for its site adjacent to culturally important and significant elements such as the Dr. Sun YatSen Garden and the War Memorial.
  • Its height is inappropriate to the site, and to the Chinatown district, and is another unfortunate example of an attempt to open up the area to tower development not in keeping with the character of Chinatown.
  • Its massing is also much larger and denser than average buildings in the area.

We are also concerned that, despite these criticisms of the current and especially previous proposals for this site, there continues to be very little change in the proposal revisions, other than slight adjustments that fail to address the major issues. For this reason, and giving full consideration to the above criticisms, we strongly advise Council not to approve the proposed rezoning application for 105 Keefer Street, and recommend further revisions to the proposal before further consideration is given.

Sincerely,

Larry Benge, Chair

On behalf of the Coalition of Vancouver Neighbourhoods
Contact: info@coalitionvan.org

Member Groups of the Coalition of Vancouver Neighbourhoods

Arbutus Ridge Community Association
Arbutus Ridge/ Kerrisdale/ Shaughnessy Visions
Cedar Cottage Area Neighbours
Chinatown Action Group
Citygate Intertower Group
Community Association of New Yaletown
Crosstown Residents Association
Downtown Eastside Neighbourhood Council
Dunbar Residents Association
False Creek Residents Association
Grandview Woodland Area Council
Granville Burrard Residents & Business Association
Joyce Area Residents Association
Kitsilano-Arbutus Residents Association
Kits Point Residents Association
Marpole Residents Coalition
Norquay Residents
NW Point Grey Home Owners Association
Oakridge Langara Area Residents
Ray-Cam
Residents Association Mount Pleasant
Riley Park/South Cambie Visions
Shaughnessy Heights Property Owners Association
Strathcona Residents Association
Upper Kitsilano Residents Association
West End Neighbours
West Kitsilano Residents Association
West Point Grey Residents Association

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CVN Sends Letter to Mayor and Council Opposing Use of Development Levies for Transit

On October 17, 2016, the Coalition of Vancouver Neighbourhoods sent the following letter to Mayor Gregor Robertson and the Vancouver City Council. This letter is in support of Motion B.1, Ensuring Vancouver Development Levies are Not Used to Fund Transit.

As explained in the letter, CVN is strongly opposed to the use of development taxes or property taxes to fund transit, or policies that make increased development a requirement to receive transit funding.

CVN represents a diverse group of nearly 30 neighbourhood associations all across the City of Vancouver.

This letter is also available for download as a PDF (146kb):
Motion 1B-Oct.18-2016-CVN letter.pdf

October 17, 2016

Mayor Gregor Robertson and Councillors City of Vancouver

Re: Motion B.1 – Oct. 18, 2016 – Ensuring Vancouver Development Levies are Not Used to Fund Transit
http://council.vancouver.ca/20161018/documents/motionb1.pdf

The Coalition of Vancouver Neighbourhoods (CVN) is strongly in support of Motion B.1 – Ensuring Vancouver Development Levies are Not Used to Fund Transit.

We have only one suggested change to the resolution, item #3 as follows (addition in yellow):

3. The City of Vancouver opposes making provincial transit funding contingent on the City’s use of Community Amenity Contributions (CACs) or Development Cost levies (DCLs) to fund transit as that would infringe on the City’s authority and responsibility to implement public amenity strategies as embedded in local area plans and would make it impossible for the City to adequately fund affordable housing and other essential public amenities.

While we support increasing affordable transit in Metro Vancouver, we are opposed to the use of development taxes (CACS or DCLs) or property taxes to fund transit or policies to make increased development a requirement of transit funding. Provincial insistence on this course would seriously undermine the civic tax base, jeopardize the municipal democratic process and infringe on municipal authority.

To avoid further provincial downloading of transit costs onto the City of Vancouver, we encourage you to pass this motion with this amendment and to write to the Province of BC as proposed.

Sincerely,

Larry A. Benge, Chair

On behalf of the Coalition of Vancouver Neighbourhoods.
Contact: info@coalitionvan.org

Member Groups of the Coalition of Vancouver Neighbourhoods

Arbutus Ridge Community Association
Arbutus Ridge/ Kerrisdale/ Shaughnessy Visions
Cedar Cottage Area Neighbours
Chinatown Action Group
Citygate Intertower Group
Community Association of New Yaletown
Crosstown Residents Association
Downtown Eastside Neighbourhood Council
Dunbar Residents Association
False Creek Residents Association
Grandview Woodland Area Council
Granville Burrard Residents & Business Association
Joyce Area Residents
Kitsilano-Arbutus Residents Association
Kits Point Residents Association
Marpole Oakridge Community Association
Norquay Residents
NW Point Grey Home Owners Association
Oakridge Langara Area Residents
Ray-Cam
Residents Association Mount Pleasant
Riley Park/South Cambie Visions
Shaughnessy Heights Property Owners Association
Strathcona Residents Association
Upper Kitsilano Residents Association
West End Neighbours Society
West Kitsilano Residents Association
West Point Grey Residents Association

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CVN Sends Letter to Premier Clark re Transit and Housing Policies

On September 26, 2016, the Coalition of Vancouver Neighbourhoods sent the following letter to Premier Christy Clark regarding land use planning and transit funding.

As explained in the letter, CVN is strongly opposed to the use of development taxes or property taxes to fund transit, or policies that make increased development a requirement to receive transit funding.

Instead, CVN supports more affordable transit options as detailed in the Appendix below.

CVN represents a diverse group of nearly 30 neighbourhood associations all across the City of Vancouver.

This letter is also available for download as a PDF (609kb):
cvn-to-premier-clark-bc-transit-housing-policies_26-sep-2016-final.pdf

September 26, 2016

Premier Christy Clark
Province of British Columbia

cc:
Hon. Rich Coleman (Minister of Natural Gas Development and Minister Responsible for Housing and Deputy Premier)
Hon. Peter Fassbender (Minister of Community, Sport and Cultural Development, Minister Responsible for TransLink)
Hon. Mary Polak (Minister of Environment)
City of Vancouver (Mayor and Council)
Translink (Board)
Metro Vancouver (Board)
Metro Vancouver region – all Mayors and Councilors

Re: BC Provincial transit and housing policies

The Coalition of Vancouver Neighbourhoods (CVN) is a coalition of resident associations from across the City of Vancouver. We are writing to you in response to concerns about recent reports of the province’s intention to use land based taxes to fund transit and to make increased development a condition of transit funding.

Since municipalities only get 7% of the tax base, while provincial and federal governments get 93%, we are opposed to the municipal tax base being further eroded. Municipalities mainly depend on property taxes and development fees to fund civic services and infrastructure. Transit is a provincial/federal responsibility for funding and the province should not be using either of these funding sources for transit. To do so is an unfair tax grab by the province.

Further, land use planning is the jurisdiction of municipal governments. It would undermine the public hearing process if the province were to make development rezoning a requirement of transit funding. Planning around transit should be based on local community planning processes, not on provincial interference in the municipal democratic process.

Therefore, we are strongly opposed to the use of development taxes (CACS or DCLs) or property taxes to fund transit or policies to make increased development a requirement of transit funding. Provincial insistence on this course would seriously jeopardize the municipal democratic process and infringe on municipal authority.

We do, however, support more affordable transit options as suggested in the Appendix below.

Sincerely,
Larry Benge, Chair
On behalf of the Coalition of Vancouver Neighbourhoods.

Member Groups of the Coalition of Vancouver Neighbourhoods

Arbutus Ridge Community Association
Arbutus Ridge / Kerrisdale / Shaughnessy Visions
Cedar Cottage Area Neighbours
Chinatown Action Group
Citygate Intertower Group
Community Association of New Yaletown
Crosstown Residents Association
Downtown Eastside Neighbourhood Council
Dunbar Residents Association
False Creek Residents Association
Grandview Woodland Area Council
Granville Burrard Residents & Business Association
Joyce Area Residents
Kitsilano-Arbutus Residents Association
Kits Point Residents Association
Marpole Oakridge Community Association
Norquay Residents
NW Point Grey Home Owners Association
Oakridge Langara Area Residents
Raycam
Residents Association Mount Pleasant Riley
Park/South Cambie Visions
Shaughnessy Heights Property Owners Association
Strathcona Residents Association
Upper Kitsilano Residents Association
West End Neighbours Society
West Kitsilano Residents Association
West Point Grey Residents Association

APPENDIX

TRANSIT

Negative impacts of transit tied to high density transit-oriented development
The Metro Vancouver Region’s designation of major transit infrastructure routes as Frequent Transit Development Areas (FTDA) encourages, requires and supports extremely high density development. This is the city and region’s proposed direction for the area referred to as the Broadway Corridor from Nanaimo/Commercial Drive to UBC, 4th Avenue to 16th Avenue. While this plan would involve a radical transformation of the Broadway Corridor and affected neighbourhoods, public consultation has been minimal with community input not reflected in the plan.

The proposed first phase of development of the Corridor is identified to be a subway from Vancouver Community College to Arbutus Street. If the first phase is approved, the city has indicated it would be also looking at land use designations west of Arbutus to UBC in anticipation of a phase two extension of a subway to UBC. This will have significant impacts on neighbourhoods in and surrounding the Broadway Corridor without their support.

Under this scheme for the Broadway Corridor, the City’s Transportation 2040 policies and the KPMG report propose that development could be similar to that of the Cambie Corridor, on the Oakridge Mall scale (redevelopment approval added 11 towers up to 45 storeys in height) as a model for sites such as the Jericho Lands. This scheme would not be an appropriate fit for our neighbourhoods and would destroy its existing character and not provide the kinds of medium density family-oriented housing that are so desperately needed in our city.

Worse yet is the very real possibility that neighbourhoods could be transformed by transit-oriented development and densification well in advance of transit infrastructure that may not be provided for decades, if ever. Meanwhile, intense levels of new development would add further congestion to the already severe impacts of UBC commuter traffic.

Amenities Starved for Transit Funds
Problems arise if subway funding is tied to a Public Private Partnership (P3) model, or if development is used to fund transit. These funding models would divert Community Amenity Contributions (CACs) paid by developers into funds that would pay for transit rather than for amenities for the community and its increased population. This is an unacceptable form of downloading the cost of transit onto cities and communities.

The Future of Transit
It is by no means certain that, in the long term, future transit systems will be dominated by large scale high cost projects. It is clear from the recent transit plebiscite that the public is fed up with continually paying for high cost transit, and is demanding more accountability.

Proponents of a Broadway Corridor subway would like to boil the choice of options down to efficiency and “megaproject” economic stimulus. However, the broader implications of competing public transit visions for Vancouver and its neighbourhoods are vastly more complicated and significant.

There are other options to promoting a nodal pattern of high-rise development through high-cost underground rapid transit on a single corridor. Others advocate for a high-capacity, at-grade transit network that is more evenly distributed and reinforces a pattern and scale of urban development that is more affordable, livable, socially productive and supports businesses on a broader city-wide scale.

Studies have shown that a more evenly distributed transit network is also more cost effective (see below results of a UBC- based study). These studies indicate that it is also vastly more sustainable from an environmental perspective to replace existing fossil- fuelled diesel buses with a combination of higher-capacity, zero-emission electric streetcars and articulated trolleybuses. The existing transit grid could have more frequent transit and expanded routes throughout the city and on key routes of heavy demand.

For the price of this….

Image showing single Broadway subway line, serving a small area of Vancouver

We can have this…

Image showing a grid of transit lines, serving nearly the entire area of Vancouver

Equivalent electric streetcar network deliverable for same cost of proposed Broadway Corridor subway
(Condon, et al, 2008, The case for the tram; learning from Portland, Sustainability by Design – An examination of alternatives to an underground extension of the Millennium Line to UBC, Foundational Research Bulletin, No. 6.)

How This Affects Us
There is a real danger that our neighbourhoods, and in particular larger sites such as the Jericho Lands, could be planned and built based on an outdated approach and faulty assumptions. Many informed sources suggest that a nodal based approach to transit, based on transit megaprojects and high rise development, is probably not the way of the future as some have suggested.

The Federal Liberal Party platform said only that they would support “rapid” transit on Broadway, but rapid transit can take a variety of forms other than a subway. Rapid transit could instead be streetcars or rapid electric trolley buses, or other combinations of grade level transit at a fraction of the cost as noted in the example above.

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CVN Letter Supports Grandview Woodlands Area Council

CVN requests delay of council decision so residents can review plan

The Coalition of Vancouver Neighbourhoods sent the following letter on July 25, 2016, to the Mayor and Council regarding the proposed Grandview Woodland Community Plan.

CVN shares the concerns of the Grandview Woodland Area Council (GWAC) and joins GWAC in their request for a delay of the council decision regarding the proposed plan.

CVN represents a diverse set of nearly 30 neighbourhood associations all across the City of Vancouver.

This letter is also available for download as a PDF:
CVN Letter to council – Grandview Community Plan-Final

July 25, 2016

City of Vancouver Council

Dear Mayor Gregor Robertson and Councillors,

Re: Grandview-Woodland Community Plan, July 26, 2016

The Coalition of Vancouver Neighbourhoods (CVN) supports the Grandview Woodland Area Council (GWAC) in their stated concerns about the proposed Grandview Woodland Community Plan and supports their request for a delay of the City of Vancouver Council decision on the plan. GWAC is a member group of CVN.

GWAC has made a very reasonable request of delay. As stated in their press release:

“Among the top concerns of residents” said GWAC President Dorothy Barkley, “is having only one summer month to read, digest, and respond to a 250-page document.” Both the Citizens’ Assembly and the planners had almost a year to think about the plan for the neighbourhood. Residents need at least a few months. “GWAC is calling on the City to delay the decision on the Draft Plan to at least November 2016 and to provide a clear mechanism by which resident feedback will be incorporated into the plan.”

Even for those residents who did manage to make it through the 250 page draft plan there were other complications. Further we note that the proposed Plan was changed from DRAFT to a revised final document with only five business days before the council meeting, and that no change bars were included to assist residents in digesting the material and any changes.

A delay as proposed would be consistent with the CVN document Principles and Goals for Collaborative Neighbourhood-based Planning in the City of Vancouver as supported by neighbourhood groups across the city. We urge Council to grant them this reasonable request.

Sincerely,

Larry Benge, Co-Chair

On behalf of the Coalition of Vancouver Neighbourhoods

Member Groups of the Coalition of Vancouver Neighbourhoods

Arbutus Ridge Community Association
Arbutus Ridge / Kerrisdale / Shaughnessy Visions
Cedar Cottage Area Neighbours
Chinatown Action Group
Citygate Intertower Group
Community Association of New Yaletown
Crosstown Residents Association
Downtown Eastside Neighbourhood Council
Dunbar Residents Association
False Creek Residents Association
Grandview Woodland Area Council
Granville Burrard Residents & Business Association
Joyce Area Residents
Kitsilano-Arbutus Residents Association
Kits Point Residents Association
Marpole Oakridge Community Association
Norquay Residents
NW Point Grey Home Owners Association
Oakridge Langara Area Residents
Raycam
Residents Association Mount Pleasant Riley
Park/South Cambie Visions
Shaughnessy Heights Property Owners Association
Strathcona Residents Association
Upper Kitsilano Residents Association
West End Neighbours Society
West Kitsilano Residents Association
West Point Grey Residents Association

Reference Documents
Council Meeting July 26, 2016 and Reports
http://council.vancouver.ca/20160726/20160726ag.htm

Grandview Woodland Area Council (GWAC) press release
http://www.gwac.ca/news/media-advisory-grandview-woodland-area-council-does-not-endorse-the- draft-grandview-woodland-neighbourhood-plan

Coalition of Vancouver Neighbourhoods (CVN) Principles and Goals for Collaborative Neighbourhood- based Planning in the City of Vancouver
http://coalitionvan.org/principles-and-goals/

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CVN Letter Supports Chinatown Community in Opposition to Rezoning

The Coalition of Vancouver Neighbourhoods sent the following letter on June 29, 2016, to the Mayor and Council regarding the rezoning application for 105 Keefer St. and 544 Columbia St., in Chinatown.

CVN joins the local Chinatown community in opposing this rezoning application.

CVN represents a diverse set of nearly 30 neighbourhood associations all across the City of Vancouver.

This letter is also available for download as a PDF:
CVN Letter to Council – Chinatown – Keefer St.- June 29-2016.

For additional information about the rezoning application, see:
http://former.vancouver.ca/commsvcs/planning/rezoning/applications/105keefer/index.htm

June 29, 2016
City of Vancouver Council

Re: Rezoning Application for 105 Keefer St. and 544 Columbia St., Chinatown

Dear Mayor Gregor Robertson and Councillors,

We join the local community to OPPOSE the above rezoning application. We are concerned about the development pressure currently being forced onto this vulnerable community and request that this application not be approved as proposed.

Please listen to the community for a better design of a much smaller scale that fits into the heritage character of the Chinatown neighbourhood and minimizes the impacts on the Chinese Cultural Centre and the Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Garden across the street.

Please ensure the new development is revised in a way that the local community supports. Sincerely,

Larry Benge, Co-Chair

On behalf of the Coalition of Vancouver Neighbourhoods

Member Groups of the Coalition of Vancouver Neighbourhoods

Arbutus Ridge Community Association
Arbutus Ridge / Kerrisdale / Shaughnessy Visions
Cedar Cottage Area Neighbours
Chinatown Action Group
Citygate Intertower Group
Community Association of New Yaletown Crosstown Residents Association
Downtown Eastside Neighbourhood Council Dunbar Residents Association
False Creek Residents Association
Grandview Woodland Area Council
Granville Burrard Residents & Business Association
Joyce Area Residents
Kitsilano-Arbutus Residents Association
Kits Point Residents Association
Marpole Oakridge Community Association
Norquay Residents
NW Point Grey Home Owners Association
Oakridge Langara Area Residents
Raycam
Residents Association Mount Pleasant
Riley Park / South Cambie Visions
Shaughnessy Heights Property Owners Association
Strathcona Residents Association
Upper Kitsilano Residents Association
West End Neighbours Society
West Kitsilano Residents Association
West Point Grey Residents Association

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CVN Sends Letters to Mayor, Council re Joyce-Collingwood, Affordable Housing, and Mole Hill

The Coalition of Vancouver Neighbourhoods (CVN) has written letters to the Mayor and Council regarding three items on the City of Vancouver Council agenda for Tuesday June 14, 2016.

The agenda for this meeting is posted on the City of Vancouver website at http://council.vancouver.ca/20160614/regu20160614ag.htm

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